Development And Realisation: Representation

REPRESENTATION CAN BE BROKEN UP INTO FOUR ELEMENTS:

  1. Form/Composition – innovative tool
  2. Colour – implications of colour
  3. Visualisation – creativity & thinking
  4. Structure – innovative ways

Gestalt is a psychology term which means “unified whole”. It refers to theories of visual perception developed by German psychologists in the 1920s. These theories attempt to describe how people tend to organise visual elements into groups or unified wholes when certain principles are applied. These principles are: Closure, proximity, continuation, similarly & figure and ground.

representation

Different laws, perception and context, and Structure:
– Laws of proximity
– Laws of similarity
– Laws of symmetry
– Laws of continuity
– Laws of closure
– Figure-Ground

Colour:
– Culturally influenced within the spectrum of colour.
– Different meanings in different parts of the world.

Information visualisation:
– Expressing data through forms and visualisation in a clear structure in a simple form.
– Presenting data effectively.
– Convert data into graphics.
– Target audience.
– Data/form colour and composition.
– Info graphics.
– Need to create a concept that is simple but easy to understand.

Screen Shot 2014-11-28 at 17.18.27
If we place a set of shapes orderly close to each other we perceive them as a group – unified mass. When we start to cluster a simple shape we start to perceive it as having relationships, that connect.
Screen Shot 2014-11-28 at 17.18.43
Things that are close to one another are perceived to be more related than things that are spaced farther apart. 
Screen Shot 2014-11-28 at 17.26.46
Using similarity to show individualism – example of a graphic which is using slices to highlight the differences but graphically it works as we perceive it as a whole fruit body.
Screen Shot 2014-11-28 at 17.19.10
Using proximity and similarity – we can start to form specific groups. In this example which plots children’s deaths we can see that they have used similarity in shape, colour and form – http://www.jackhagley.com/What-kills-children
Screen Shot 2014-11-28 at 17.19.24
Law of symmetry – when two symmetrical elements are unconnected the mind tends to connect them to form a whole shape.
Laws of continuity - elements of objects tend to be grouped together. Where individuals components in this case umbrella and tap are joined we perceive the two objects as two single uninterrupted entities.
Laws of continuity – elements of objects tend to be grouped together. Where
individuals components in this case umbrella and tap are joined we perceive the two
objects as two single uninterrupted entities.
Law of closure- perceiving individual objects as whole. Specifically when parts of the picture are missing our perception fills the missing gap. Shigeo Fukuda, Japanese graphic designer in the 60s which used this method  effectively In this poster for a no war campaign, missiles form into death.
Law of closure- perceiving individual objects as whole. Specifically when parts of the
picture are missing our perception fills the missing gap.
Shigeo Fukuda, Japanese graphic designer in the 60s which used this method
effectively In this poster for a no war campaign, missiles form into death.

 

Colour plays a huge role whilst being a designer. A question that comes up all the time when in the planning phase of a particular piece of work is: what does colour mean to us culturally?
When choosing a tone, tint or hue to represent your graphics/information, you
need to think beyond how it looks aesthetically.
Colour can mean completely different things in different cultures.
Weddings in the western world are associated with white whereas in Asia funerals are.

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